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    Owens Community College
   
 
  Jul 27, 2017
 
 
    
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2012-13 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Glossary of Academic Terms


Abroad - Any geographic location not in the aggregate United States, which includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the other areas.

Academic Advisor - Academic advisors are a student’s principal point of contact for academic issues that impact educational progress. They are familiar with the College and your program and can either answer your questions themselves or direct you to one of many campus resources. An academic advisor can assist a student with course planning, registration, and academic counseling. A student is assigned an advisor upon being accepted into the College and will work with the same individual throughout his or her degree or certificate program. Advisor assignments can be found on Ozone.

Academic Calendar - The divisions of the full calendar composed of two regular terms per year with 15 weeks per term of instruction excluding final examinations in a school year running from August through May, with the third semester as a summer session. The Academic Calendar specifies the official dates for semesters, part of terms, examination periods, holidays, dates when classes are not in session, and commencement.

Academic Dismissal - When a student’s academic performance is consistently poor over time and his/her cumulative grade point average (GPA) is below 2.0. Academic dismissal prohibits the student from enrolling for one semester. Summer semester is not considered as a semester of prohibited enrollment unless the summer semester is required in the specific program of study. A second academic dismissal prohibits the student from enrolling for one calendar year.

Academic Honors - Designation indicated on the College diploma and transcript to reflect outstanding scholarship. Honors are conferred upon graduating students who have attained an overall cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or above for all credit coursework completed at Owens. Academic honors are designated according to the following GPA classifications:

3.91 – 4.00 = Summa Cum Laude
3.80 – 3.90 = Magna Cum Laude
3.50 – 3.79 = Cum Laude

Academic Probation - Academic probation is the result of unsatisfactory scholarship. It is not a penalty but a warning and an opportunity to improve. Academic probation usually involves a compulsory reduction of academic load and interviews for diagnosis of difficulties and for checking on recovery. Sometimes it brings a required restriction of extracurricular activities and general surveillance. Usually the student is required to make regular specified improvements in their record in order to avoid academic dismissal and is a middle status between good standing or dismissal. The student remains enrolled but under stated conditions according to College policies.

Academic Program - A series of credit courses designed to lead to a degree, diploma or certificate in a field of study or occupation.

Academic Record - Every student who has ever been enrolled at Owens will have the details of their academic achievements recorded in the College’s database. The official record of these achievements is called an Academic Record or Academic Transcript. This record details your entire academic history with Owens.

Academic Robe – A black robe worn by Owebs graduates during the commencement ceremony.

Academic Standing - A designation that signifies that a student is eligible to continue, to return, or to transfer elsewhere. It implies good academic standing; that is, an overall GPA of 2.00 or better.

Academic Tassel – A tassel that is placed onto the top right of the mortarboard that represent the graduate’s academic discipline during the commencement ceremony. Distinguishing colors are as follows:

Associate of Arts – White

School of Arts and Sciences

Associate of Science – Gold

School of Arts and Sciences

Associate of Applied Science – Gold

School of Arts and Sciences
School of Health Sciences
School of Nursing
School of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
School of Technology
Skilled Trades Technologies

Associate of Applied Business – Drab

School of Business

Academic Transcript/Official Transcript - An official transcript is the College’s certified statement of a student’s academic record. The official transcript is printed on security sensitive paper and contains the College seal and signature of the Registrar.

Academic Year - The annual period, during which a student attends college. The academic year has two main semesters, a first, (typically August through December) and a second (January through May). An elective summer session (typically May thru July) is also available and may be required for some programs.

Accreditation – A process by which private educational associations of regional or national scope, develop evaluation criteria and conduct peer evaluations to assess whether or not those criteria are met.

ACT - Previously known as the American College Testing program, measures educational development and readiness to pursue college-level coursework in English, mathematics, natural science, and social studies. Student performance does not reflect innate ability and is influenced by a student’s educational preparedness.

Adult Basic Education - Courses designed primarily for students 16 years of age and older to improve basic skills in reading, writing, and arithmetic. These courses are not intended to be part of a program leading to a high school credential, nor are they part of any academic, occupational, or vocational program at the post-secondary level.

Advanced Placement (AP) Program/Courses - is a curriculum in the United States sponsored by the College Board which offers standardized courses to high school students that are generally recognized to be equivalent to undergraduate courses in college.  Acceptable scores allow students to earn college credit toward a degree, certificate or other formal award.

Advanced Standing - Is articulated credit for courses based on previous college credit,  certifications, work or experiential learning.

Alumni - Owens recipients of a degree or certificate, or those who have completed credit or non-credit course work with the College.

American Council on Education (ACE) - Was created in 1942 to recognize the educational value of military training and experience. Since that time ACE has continuously evaluated military schools, correspondence courses and occupations to determine the amount and level of academic credit each should be awarded. Through ACE, you can take academic credit for most of the training you have received, including Basic Training. The ACE military evaluations program is funded by the Department of Defense (DoD) and coordinated through DANTES.

Applicant - An individual who has fulfilled the institution’s requirements to be considered for admission (including payment or waiving of the application fee, if any) and who has been notified of one of the following actions: admission, non-admission, placement on waiting list, or application withdrawn by applicant or institution.

Articulation - The systematic coordination between institutions of higher education to ensure the efficient and effective movement of students among those institutions, while guaranteeing the students’ continuous advancement in learning.

Articulation of Credit/Transfer of Credit - The policies and procedures used to determine the extent to which educational experiences or courses undertaken by a student while attending another institution may be counted for credit at the current institution.

(ASSET®) Student Success System - Is a testing and advising program used for placing students into postsecondary institutions

Associate Degree – An associate’s degree is an undergraduate academic degree awarded by colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study usually lasting two years.

Associate of Applied Business Degree (AAB) - The associate of applied business degree provides students with the applied knowledge, theory and experience needed to pursue employment in specific occupational areas; these degrees may transfer into the academic curriculum at other four-year colleges and universities. Because course requirements vary, it is recommended that students pursuing an AAB discuss goals with an Advisor or a representative from the desired transfer institution.

Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS) -The associate of applied science degree provides students with the applied knowledge, theory and experience needed to pursue employment in specific occupational areas; these degrees may transfer into the academic curriculum at other four-year colleges and universities. Students who intend to transfer may find it beneficial to take additional general education courses, but because course requirements vary, it is recommended that students pursuing an AAS discuss goals with an Advisor or a representative from the desired transfer institution.

Associate of Arts Degree (AA) - An associate of arts degree provides background in general education and is equivalent to the first two years of study toward a bachelor’s (baccalaureate) degree in the humanities, social sciences, general studies or fine arts. Students pursuing an AA may select courses in any of the concentrations listed in this Catalog. Students who intend to transfer to a four-year college or university should contact an admissions representative from that school to assure that elective courses will transfer.

Associate of Science Degree (AS) - An associate of science degree provides background in general education and is equivalent to the first two years of a bachelor’s (baccalaureate) degree in the sciences, social sciences, mathematics and selected pre-professional programs. Students pursuing an AS may select courses in any of the concentrations listed in this Catalog. Students who intend to transfer to a four-year college or university should contact an admissions representative from that school to assure that elective courses will transfer.

Associate of Technical Studies Degree (ATS) - The associate of technical studies degree program is structured around the needs of students for whom existing associate degree programs do not fulfill educational goals.  There are two technical studies programs. The Type A program requires 30 credit hours from two technical areas with a minimum of 21 credit hours in one area and nine credit hours in the other. The Type B program offers up to 30 credit hours of “block credit” for individuals with educational and occupational experiences not previously granted college credit. For example, a registered radiographer who has obtained a certificate from a hospital-based radiography program may receive block credit toward a degree, as may a journeyperson who has completed a formal apprenticeship program.  Interested students must discuss goals with an Advisor and complete a separate application for the ATS program. Admission to the College is a prerequisite. For a complete list of procedures visit ATS Website.

Book Voucher- A book voucher is an authorization to make purchases at the Owens Bookstore and charge them to the student’s account at the college. It is provided to eligible students who are expected to have money available from financial aid, athletic scholarships, or third-party organizations to pay for bookstore purchases. 

Bursar – See Office of Student Accounts.

Certificate/Academic Certificate - A certificate is comprised of course work designed to reflect specialized expertise and officially signifies that a student has successfully completed a series of courses predetermined by the academic department; the courses designated in a certificate already exist in a department’s approved curriculum.

Certificate Seeking Student - One who has fulfilled the admissions requirements and who is enrolled in courses for credit and is recognized by the institution as seeking a certificate.  High school students also enrolled in postsecondary courses for credit are not considered certificate seeking.

Classroom Hour - A classroom hour is a nominal hour (fifty minutes) of formalized instruction, conducted on- or off-campus, in which the teacher presents an educational experience to students, applying any combination of instructional methods. One credit (semester) shall be awarded for each classroom hour which is scheduled in the standard week of the semester.

Class Schedule - The official schedule of classes for each semester.

Clinical Hour- A clinical laboratory hour applies only to health technology programs. A clinical laboratory consists of a fifty-minute period during which students are assigned to laboratory sections which meet at a health related agency rather than in on-campus laboratory facilities. Clinical laboratory sessions provide a realistic environment for student learning. These laboratory hours should be directly supervised by regular faculty members, full-time or part-time, of the college. One credit (semester) shall be awarded for a minimum of three clinical laboratory hours in a standard week for which little or no out-of class study is required. One credit (semester) shall be awarded for a minimum of two clinical laboratory hours in a standard week, if supplemented by out-of-class assignments which would normally average one hour of out-of-class study preparing for or following up the Clinical laboratory experience.

Clock Hour – A specific measure that represents an hour of scheduled instruction given to students. Also referred to as contact hour.

Cohort - A group of individuals who have shared a particular experience during a particular time span; a specific group of students established for tracking purposes.

College Catalog/Bulletin - The catalog provides information about the college, courses, services, policies and procedures and is published every academic year.

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) - Allows students to earn college credit without actually having to attend class. CLEP exams allow students to demonstrate knowledge they have obtained through independent study or prior life, work, or cultural experiences.

Commencement/Graduation - A formal ceremony in which colleges confer degrees to graduating students.

Concentration - At a community college, a concentration is a thematically coherent block of courses that are more similar to one another than to others in the degree program. A concentration has a title and constitutes a significant percentage (e.g., 10%) of courses in the degree program. Concentrations may be recorded on the student transcript.

COMPASS™ - Is a comprehensive computer-adaptive testing system that helps place students into appropriate courses and maximizes the information post-secondary schools need to ensure student success. COMPASS offers placement and diagnostic testing in mathematics, reading, and writing—and now includes placement testing for English as a Second Language (ESL) students.

Contact Hours – The number of hours the class meets per week.  Also referred to as clock hours.

Core Courses - Classes that all students in a program of study are required to take.

Co-requisite - Courses a student must take with another course.

Course - A specific subject studied within a limited period of time for which credit toward graduation or certification is usually given. Courses may utilize lecture, discussion, laboratory, seminar, workshop, studio, independent study, internship, or other similar teaching formats to facilitate learning.

Course Completion – Successful completion of a credit course for which a student receives a recorded grade of A, B, C, D or PNP.

Course Description - May include course objectives, prerequisites, target group information, and prework details as well as the overall course description.

Course Instructional Delivery Methods - Multiple delivery methods may be used to instruct a course.  Examples of instructional delivery methods are as follows:

Cablecast - A cable television broadcast available at the scheduled meeting time of the class, enabling participation in discussions via telephone from home and other locations outside the classroom. Instructors are frequently available by telephone or in person for consultation.

Computer Lab - Computer-based instruction and the assignment of computer lab time for the preparation of course papers, projects, and other submission requirements.

Distance Learning - An option for earning course credit at off-campus locations via cable television, internet, satellite classes, videotapes, correspondence courses, or other means.

E-mail - The use of e-mail in communicating curricular content or providing written exchanges among students and faculty members associated with the course section.

Hybrid Class - A class in which instruction is delivered via the Web that requires a student to come to campus.

Interactive TV/Telecourse/OwensLINK - The use of live TV for transmitting course content to other locations outside the classroom and for facilitating discussion among participants at remote sites.

Other Technology - Other technologies, such as overhead projectors, chalkboards, slide projectors, maps and charts, etc.  Also included are “hands on” type of learning experiences, such as the setting up and testing of programmable machines.

Video - The use of pre-recorded and real-time (“live”) video or audio as part of the course section’s instructional delivery.

World Wide Web/Web/Online - The use of the Web solely to present course, related materials and links to supplementary sites.  Students are not required to come to campus.

Web-Enhanced - The use of a web course delivery system within a course which meets the full allotted amount of time on campus.

Weekend/Evening Delivery - A program that allows students to take a complete course of study and attend classes only on weekends or only in the evenings.

Course Inventory - The course inventory is a record of all active, planned, and phased-out courses.

Course Load - The totall number of credit hours taken in a semester.

Course Number - The 3 digit number that identifies a specific course, such as 111 in English 111, Composition I.

Course Prefixes /Subject Codes - The 2, 3, or 4-letter abbreviation that appears before the course and section numbers that typically represents a discipline such as in ENG, for English, ENG111001.

Course Reference Number (CRN) - The CRN is a distinct 5 digit number that uniquely identifies each section of a course.

Course Section - One of several classes of the same course. A 3 or 4 alpha numeric code is used to identify each section of each course offered and is located after the course prefix and number such as 001 for ENG111001.

Course Section/Schedule Types:

Clinical/Clinical Laboratory Hour - A clinical laboratory hour applies only to health technology programs. A clinical laboratory consists of a fifty minute period during which students are assigned to laboratory sections which meet at a health-related agency rather than in on campus laboratory facilities. Clinical laboratory sessions provide a realistic environment for student learning. These laboratory hours should be directly supervised by regular faculty members, full-time or part-time, of the College.

Clinical - A clinical laboratory applies only to health technology programs. A clinical is a laboratory section which meets at a health-related agency facility in lieu of on-campus laboratory facilities. Clinical laboratory sessions provide a realistic environment for student learning. During a clinical laboratory session, a regular faculty member directly supervises the class. The instructor assigned to teach clinical laboratory sessions will be a full- or part-time faculty member.

Cooperative Work Experience/Internship - A cooperative work experience is on- or off-campus paid employment. It augments formal classroom instruction. The experience is coordinated by a faculty member of the college who visits the job site for a conference with the student and supervisor at least once during the quarter or semester, and assigns the course grade to the student after appropriate consultation with the supervisor/employer. Each student who is enrolled in cooperative work experience shall also enroll in an on-campus seminar. One credit (semester) shall be awarded for a minimum of ten clock hours of cooperative work experience which is scheduled during a week. A maximum of nine semester credit hours may be earned in cooperative work experience, or any combination of cooperative work experience and practicum, over the associate degree program.

Directed Practice/Directed Practice Hour - This definition applies primarily to programs in the health technologies. A directed practice hour consists of a sixty-minute period during which the student is assigned to practice experiences under constant supervision at an external agency. The student should receive individual instruction and critique in the performance of a particular function.

Discussion  - Used most often in conjunction with a lab to describe an instructional format in which the observations made in the lab are further discussed. This may be a formal class in which discussion, rather than lecture, is the pedagogical structure.

Individual Studies - Course sections in which a faculty member works with a student or small group of students. Individual Studies may be associated with coursework or with Master’s and Doctoral level requirements. 

Independent Study - A course of study undertaken outside the classroom by a student under the supervision of one or more faculty members.

Interdisciplinary - Designating a combination of subject matter from two or more disciplines within a course or program.

Field Experience - Field experience is planned, paid work activity which relates to an individual student’s occupational objectives, such as geology or archaeology, and which is taken in lieu of elective or required courses in his or her program with the permission of a faculty advisor. The experience is coordinated by a faculty member of the college who assists the student in planning the experience, visits the site of the experience for a conference with the student and his or her supervisor at least once during the semester, and assigns the course grade to the student after the appropriate consultation with the employer or supervisor.

Lab (Lab)  - A laboratory is an educational activity in which students conduct experiments, perfect skills, or practice procedures under the direction of a faculty member. 

Laboratory Hour (Lab) - A laboratory hour is fifty minutes of educational activity with students conducting experiments, perfecting skills, or practicing procedures under the direction of a faculty member. One credit (semester) shall be awarded for a minimum of three laboratory hours in a standard week for which little or no out-of class study is required. One credit (semester) shall be awarded for a minimum of two laboratory hours in a standard week, if supplemented by out-of-class assignments which would normally average one hour of out-of-class study preparing for or following up the laboratory experience.

Lecture/Semester/Classroom Hour/(Lec) - Teaching method in which the professor presents information applying any combination of instructional methods to the students, who take notes, ask questions, and have dialogue with the professor.

Observation/Observation Hour - An observation hour is an hour during which students participate in an educational experience as observers of practitioners representative of the occupational area. Students may participate at times in the actual work activity. Observation hours are coordinated by faculty members who receive reports from the students of their observational experiences and provide assessments of students’ progress toward the achievement of the objectives of the experience. One credit (semester) shall be awarded for a minimum of fifteen clock hours of observational experience in a week.

Other (Oth) - Courses in this category are those for which extended periods of concentrated practice are required of the student subsequent to sessions of individualized instruction.

Practicum/Practicum Hour - A practicum hour is an on- or off-campus work experience, integrated with academic instruction. Students concurrently apply theoretical concepts to practical situations within an occupational field. To assure proper coordination of the experience, the practicum is coordinated by a faculty member who visits the student at least once biweekly, provides the final grade, and teaches at least one course on the campus. Each student who is enrolled in a practicum shall also be enrolled in an on campus seminar. One credit (semester) shall be awarded for a minimum of seven clock hours per week in a practicum. A maximum of nine semester credit hours may be earned in practicum, or any combination of practicum and cooperative work experience, over the associate degree program.

Recitation/Reflection - Recitation or a reflection are small breakout groups which meet in conjunction with a lecture to review exams, discuss issues, address questions, and extend the instruction that occurs in the larger lecture.

Self-paced/Independent Learning - Courses that are offered that allow for students to progress at their own pace.

Seminar - A seminar is an educational experience which is less formal than a classroom/lecture/discussion class, in which a relatively small number of students engage in discussions which are directed by a faculty member in the development and/or review of concepts which have been or are to be applied to practical situations.

Studio - Studio is used to describe music, performance art, and theater courses.

Tutorial - Used when individuals or groups of individuals are tutored by a faculty member or qualified individual.

Credit - Recognition of attendance or performance in an instructional activity (course or program) that can be applied by a recipient toward the requirements for a degree, diploma, certificate, or other formal award.

Credit Course - A course that, if successfully completed, can be applied toward the number of courses required for achieving a degree, diploma, certificate, or other formal award.

Credit/Credit Hour - A unit of measure representing the equivalent of an hour (50 minutes) of instruction per week over the entire term. It is applied toward the total number of credit hours needed for completing the requirements of a degree, diploma, certificate or other formal award.  The number of credit hours for each course usually indicates how much time is spent in the classroom each week. For example: 750 minutes of class time or instruction equals one semester hour.

Credit for Life Experiences/Experiential Learning - Credit earned by students for what they have learned through independent study, noncredit adult courses, work experience, portfolio demonstration, previous licensure or certification, or completion of other learning opportunities (military, government, or professional). Credit may also be awarded through a credit by examination program.

Credit Load - The total number of credit hours taken by a student.  Also referred to course load.

Curriculum/Curricula - A prescribed set of courses leading to a degree or certificate.

DANTES Subject Standardized Tests/DSST Exams -  Are an extensive series of examinations in college subjects that are comparable to the final or end-of-course examinations in undergraduate courses.

Deadline - The date by which certain information must be received by any given office or unit.

Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES) - is a Department of Defense organization created to help Servicemembers pursue their educational goals and earn the degrees or certification they deserve while continuing to serve their country.

Deferred Payment Plan (DPP) - Offers eligible students the opportunity to defer payment of tuition and fees over a four-month period for fall and spring semesters and a three month period for summer semester. The student will be allowed one payment plan each semester.

Degree Audit/Curriculum Advising and Program Planning (CAPP) - An automated unofficial record of a student’s academic progress toward degree or certificate completion in his/her program of study. The CAPP audit contains all requirements for a specific degree or certificate program. Final certification of degree requirements resides with the Records Office.

Degree - An award conferred by a college, university, or other post-secondary education institution as official recognition for the successful completion of a program of studies.

Degree/Certificate Requirements - A list of courses, subject areas and credit hours needed to obtain a specific degree or certificate.

Degree Seeking/Regular Student - One who has fulfilled the admissions requirements and who is enrolled in courses for credit and is recognized by the institution as seeking an associate degree.  High school students also enrolled in postsecondary courses for credit are not considered degree seeking.

Department - An academic discipline which offers instruction in a particular branch of knowledge.

Diploma - A formal document received after completing a specified course of study.

Disability Services - Programs designed to provide reasonable academic accommodations and support services to empower students who have disabilities to competitively pursue post-secondary education. May also include assistance to campus departments in providing access to services and programs in the most integrated setting possible. 

Drop/Withdraw/Add - Changing a student’s course schedule by adding and/or dropping a course or courses or all courses from the College following the procedures outlined in the College catalog.

Dual Credit - A program through which high school students are enrolled in Advanced Placement (AP) courses, taught at their high school, that fulfill high school graduation requirements and may earn the student college credits .

Dual Enrollment – A program through which high school students may enroll in college courses while still enrolled in high school.

Early Admission - A policy under which students who have not completed high school are admitted to and enrolled full-time in college, usually after completion of their junior year.

Electives  - Courses selected at a student’s discretion. Electives may be partially restricted (selected from a specified group of courses identified to fulfill a particular requirement) or they may be free electives (selected from any courses for which the student has proper prerequisites).

Enrollment Status - The official number of credit hours for which a student is enrolled each semester determines the student’s enrollment status.

Full-time enrollment = Twelve or more credit hours
Three-quarter time enrollment = Nine to less than twelve credit hours
Half-time enrollment = Six to less than nine credit hours
Less than half-time enrollment = Less than six credit hours

Evening Classes - Evening classes are offered Monday through Thursday beginning at 4:30 PM and continue until 11:20 PM.

Excelsior College Exams (ECE) - Most ECE tests are objective multiple-choice questions. Some are entirely essay. The majority of tests cover work typical of undergraduate-level courses. All the tests examine not only facts and terminology, but also the application of essential concepts and skills.

Extracurricular Activities - The academic/non-academic activities offered by a college such as clubs, athletics, honor societies, etc.

Fee Types:

Course and Material Fees - Fees assessed to courses that require additional materials that will be used by or for students in conjuncture with the course to cover instructional costs in excess of those covered by general tuition.

E-Laboratory Fees - Fees assessed to web or hybrid lab courses to cover lab related costs/materials in excess of those covered by general tuition.

E-Learning Fees - Fees assessed to web or hybrid courses to cover related costs/materials/technology in excess of those covered by general tuition.

Laboratory Fees - Fees assessed to lab courses to cover lab related costs/materials in excess of those covered by general tuition.

Parking Fees - Fees assessed for parking violations occurring in campus parking lots. Violations can include but are not limited to: parking in marked spaces without correct permits, parking in the grass or other non-designated parking spaces, parking on or over marked lines, parking in an expired meter space, and using a non-owner handicapped placard.

Final Exams - Tests or exercises given at the end of a term. The schedule for Final Exams is listed on the academic calendar each semester and published on the Owens Website.

Financial Aid Book Voucher - A financial aid book voucher is available to all financial aid recipients who have funds remaining after tuition costs are covered. The book voucher allows students to use the excess funds to purchase books and supplies from the Owens Bookstore during the book voucher period, which generally starts 2-3 weeks prior to the beginning of the semester. Students who do not wish to use a book voucher may pay at the bookstore using another method.

First-Time Student (Undergraduate) - A student who has no prior postsecondary experience (except as noted below) attending any institution for the first time at the undergraduate level. This includes students enrolled in academic or occupational programs. It also includes students enrolled in the fall term who attended college for the first time in the prior summer term, and students who entered with advanced standing (college credits earned before graduation from high school).

First Year Experience - A first year experience course entitled Foundations for College (FYE 121). This class, designed for students to take in their first 30 credits, helps the student learn more about the College, more about the many resources on campus that will support them in their efforts, and to learn more about their goals and themselves.

First-Year Student - A student who has completed less than the equivalent of 1 full year of undergraduate work; that is, less than 30 semester hours (in a 120-hour degree program) or less than 900 contact hours.

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FASFA) – The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (known as the FAFSA) is a form that can be prepared annually by current and prospective college students (undergraduate and graduate) in the United States to determine their eligibility for student financial aid (including the Pell grants, and work-study programs).

Full-Time Student (Undergraduate) - A student enrolled for 12 or more semester credits , or 12 or more quarter credits, or 24 or more contact hours a week each term.

General Education Competencies - All degree-seeking students entering or re-entering Owens must complete a series of core courses including Communication (oral and written), Mathematical Reasoning, Critical Thinking, Social Responsibility and Information Literacy. These classes are intended to prepare students with the foundations needed for further General Education classes

General Educational Development (GED) - This term normally refers to the tests of General Educational Development (GED), which provide an opportunity to earn a high school credential. The GED program, sponsored by the American Council on Education, enables individuals to demonstrate that they have acquired a level of learning comparable to that of high school graduates.

Grade Point Average (GPA) - Indicates a student’s academic progress and status on a 4.0 scale.

Overall Cumulative Grade Point Average - Is calculated by dividing the total number of quality points for all semesters by the total number of GPA hours for all semesters.

Semester Grade Point Average - Is calculated by dividing the total number of quality points for the semester by the total number of GPA hours for the semester.

Grade Point Average Hours (GPA hours) - Credits earned which affect a student’s GPA.

Grant - Financial assistance awarded to a student which does not have to be repaid; usually based on need from the federal and state government.

Guest/Self-Enrichment/Non-Degree Seeking - A student applying for admission to Owens who wants to take classes for self-improvement, personal satisfaction or job enhancement.

High School Diploma or Recognized Equivalent - A document certifying the successful completion of a prescribed secondary school program of studies, or the attainment of satisfactory scores on the GED or another state specified examination.

Holds on Student Records - Holds are actions taken by Owens to restrict a student’s registration ability or prevent the student from receiving a transcript or diploma. Holds are usually placed for academic, financial, or conduct reasons.

Institutional Accreditation/Accreditation – The evaluation of an entire organization by an accrediting agency. Formal educational activities are assessed and governance and administration, financial stability, admissions and student personnel services, resources, student academic achievement, organizational effectiveness, and relationships with outside constituencies are evaluated.

Institutional Effectiveness – The ability of an institution to math its performance to the purposes established in its mission and vision statements and to the needs and expectations of its stakeholders.

Institutional Review Board (IRB) - A specially constituted review body established or designated by an entity to protect the welfare of human subjects recruited to participate in biomedical or behavioral research.

Instructional Activity - The total number of credit and contact hours all students are engaged in during the specified period.

Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) - The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), conducted by the NCES, began in 1986 and involves annual institution-level data collections. All postsecondary institutions that have a Program Participation Agreement with the Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE), U.S. Department of Education (throughout IPEDS referred to as “Title IV”) are required to report data using a web-based data collection system. IPEDS currently consists of the following components: Institutional Characteristics (IC); 12-month Enrollment (E12);Completions (C); Human Resources (HR) composed of Employees by Assigned Position (EAP), Fall Staff (S),and Salaries (SA); Fall Enrollment (EF); Graduation Rates (GRS); Finance (F); and Student Financial Aid (SFA).

Learning Community - A group of people who share common emotions, values and beliefs, are actively engaged in learning together from each other, and by habituation. Such communities have become the template for a cohort-based, interdisciplinary approach to higher education.

Loan - Financial assistance to students which must be repaid.

Major/Program of Study - A student’s focus in their education for which they must complete specific courses in order to graduate.

Matriculating/Matriculated Student - A student who has been officially admitted to Owens as either a degree-seeking student or an exploratory student.

Military Transcript Systems/US Armed Forces and Coast Guard:

Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript Systems (AARTS) - The Army uses the AARTS system, which automatically captures academic credits from military training, and Standardized tests. The AARTS system is available to enlisted soldiers only.

Sailor/Marine/ACE Registry Transcript (SMART) - The Navy and Marine Corps use the SMART system, which automatically captures training, experience and standardized test scores.

Community College of the Airforce (CCAF) - The Airforce use the CCAF system, which automatically captures training, experience and standardized test scores.

Coast Guard Institute (CGI) - Requires each Servicemember to submit documentation of all training (except correspondence course records), along with an enrollment form, to receive a transcript.

Mortarboard – A black cap/mortarboard worn by Owens graduates during the commencement
ceremony.

New Student Orientation (NSO) - A required session for all new students (first time degree/certificate seeking students and those with 12 credit hours or less of transfer credit) prior to meeting with their advisor and selecting their classes for registration. The agenda for these sessions includes introduction to the class schedule/catalog, academic advising, the registration process through Ozone, tips for success in college and college expectations.

Non-Degree Seeking Student - A student enrolled in courses for credit who is not recognized by the institution as seeking a degree or formal award.

Non-Matriculated/Non-Matriculating - Students may take classes at Owens without being enrolled in an Owens degree or certificate program. Their official status is “non-matriculated,” which is a traditional academic term meaning “not enrolled in a degree or certificate program.”

Nonresident Alien - A person who is not a citizen or national of the United States and who is in this country on a visa or temporary basis and does not have the right to remain indefinitely.

Occupational Program - A program of study consisting of one or more courses, designed to provide the student with sufficient knowledge and skills to perform in a specific occupation.

Off-Campus Course Location - A location away from the physical campus of the college or university used for course section offerings. This location must be a physical facility that is not owned by the institution or its associated agents (i.e., foundation or alumni association).

Off-Campus Facility - A teaching facility located some distance away from the educational institution which operates it.

Office of Financial Aid - The College office that has responsibility for providing access to resources available in helping students finance their education.

Office of Student Accounts - The College office that has responsibility for billing and collecting payments for tuition and fees, student activities fees, and related charges.

Office of the Registrar/Records Office - The College office that plans and oversees registration, academic record maintenance, transcript preparation, graduation, degree audit reporting, and curricular records.

Open Admission - Admission policy whereby the school will accept any student who applies.

Oserve - Owens Community Colleges’ office for student support related to financial aid, records, and student accounts.

Out-of-State Student - A student who is not a legal resident of the state in which he/she attends school.

Out-of-State Tuition - The tuition charged by institutions to those students who do not meet the institution’s or state’s residency requirements.

Owens College Student Identification (OCID) - Upon completing an admission application, students will be assigned an OCID number, Ozone account, user name and user password. Students are responsible for knowing their OCID and keeping their OCID, user name, and password secure. Students are encouraged to change passwords upon logging in and frequently thereafter.

Ozone - A website that gives students access to important information. Students can register for classes, pay bills, print class schedules, request official transcripts, perform unofficial degree audits, change programs, intentions to pursue a degree or certificate, view their catalog of record, petition for degrees or certificates, request enrollment verification, change contact information and more.

Part of Term (POT)/Session - An abbreviated period within the full academic term during which classes are offered. For example, some fall courses are offered during the first 8 weeks of the fall term, and others are offered during the second or last 8 weeks of the term.

Pell Grant Program - (Higher Education Act of 1965, Title IV, Part A, Subpart I, as amended.) Provides grant assistance to eligible undergraduate post-secondary students with demonstrated financial need to help meet education expenses.

Petition for Certificate Completion - Petition for certificate candidacy begins with an on-line petition. When the student is in their last semester and registered for their final course requirements, the student must petition for certificate completion in order to be considered a candidate. The Records Office then certifies the students have initially fulfilled their certificate requirements.

Petition for Graduation - Petition for graduation candidacy begins with an on-line petition to graduate. When the student is in their last semester and registered for their final course requirements, the student must petition for associate degree completion in order to be considered a candidate for graduation. The Records Office then certifies that students have initially fulfilled their degree requirements.

Portfolio - A collection of work (e.g., paintings, writings, etc.) which may be used to demonstrate competency in an academic area.

Post-Secondary Education - The provision of a formal instructional program whose curriculum is designed primarily for students who are beyond the compulsory age for high school. This includes programs whose purpose is academic, vocational, and continuing professional education, and excludes a vocational and adult basic education programs.

Prerequisite - Preliminary requirements, specific conditions, or classes that must be completed before enrolling into a certain course.

Prerequisite With Concurrency - A requirement, usually the completion of another course, which may be taken at the same time as the course it is a prerequisite for.

Proficiency Exam - A examination designed to measure the student’s level of knowledge and/or skill in the content covered by a given course or courses.

Post Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) - Post Secondary Enrollment Options is a program whereby Ohio’s high school students may opt to take college courses for both high school and college credit with tuition costs paid by the state.

Public Institution - An educational institution whose programs and activities are operated by publicly elected or appointed school officials and which is supported primarily by public funds.

Quality Point - The numerical value of the grade earned using a 4.0 scale (A = 4.0 points, B = 3.0 points, etc.).

Registrar - See Office of the Registrar/Records.

Registration - The act of signing up for classes.

Registration Restriction(s) - Conditions for enrollment enforced by the Registration System. These restrictions may include one or more of the following – minimum GPA, student level, college, major, concentrations, degree, or a qualification such as teacher licensure.

Regular Student - One who has fulfilled the admissions requirements and who is pursuing a associate degree or certificate program.

Residence - A person’s permanent address determined by such evidence as a driver’s license or voter registration. For entering freshmen, residence may be the legal residence of a parent or guardian.

Resident Alien - A person who is not a citizen or national of the United States but who has been admitted as a legal immigrant for the purpose of obtaining permanent resident alien status (and who holds either an alien registration card (Form I-551 or I-151), a Temporary Resident Card (Form I-688), or an Arrival-Departure Record (Form I-94) with a notation that conveys legal immigrant status such as Section 207 Refugee, Section 208 Asylee, Conditional Entrant Parolee or Cuban-Haitian).

Residency/Reciprocity Status – Refers to whether or not a student qualifies for in-state tuition and fees.  Student’s county and state of residence as described by the permanent address on the admissions application. Determines whether a student resides in District, in State, or Out-of-State , or resides in a geographic area with reciprocity.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) (for financial aid purposes) - Academic requirements set by Owens for Federal Aid according to federal and state laws and regulations. Being eligible to enroll in classes does not mean the student has an eligible SAP status for financial aid. Academic records are reviewed for all students receiving financial aid or being considered for financial aid. The review of student’s SAP status is based on the entire academic record, even if the student did not receive financial aid for previous semesters of enrollment. This includes all transfer credit hours being accepted by the College and developmental course work taken at Owens. The SAP status is monitored after each semester’s grades are posted. After each semester has ended, a student’s SAP status will be calculated and posted on his/her Ozone account. Questions should be directed to Oserve as each student’s situation will be unique.

Scholarship - Financial assistance provided by the College or outside contributors to students awarded on the criteria determined by the donor.

School - An academic unit of the College. Each school represents an organization of related departments.

Semester/Term (Calendar System) - A calendar system that consists of two sessions called semesters during the academic year with about 15 weeks for each semester of instruction and 1 week of exams. There may be an additional summer session.

Specialized Accreditation - Specialized (or program) accreditation is the evaluation of particular units, schools, or programs within an organization by an accrediting agency. Some are discipline-based (business, computer science, and library science, for example), and many are also associated with national professional associations and state licensing (engineering, medicine, health professions, and law are good examples). Institutional accreditation is separate from the accreditation given or withheld by specialized agencies, although the Commission does take cognizance of the standards set by professional bodies.

Standardized Admission Tests - Tests prepared and administered by an agency that is independent of any post-secondary education institution. Tests provide information about prospective students and their academic qualifications relative to a national sample. Examples are the SAT and the ACT.

SAT Reasoning Test (formerly the Scholastic Aptitude Test or Scholastic Assessment Test) - Is a standardized test for college admissions in the United States. The SAT is owned, published, and developed by the College Board, a not-for-profit organization in the United States. It was formerly developed, published, and scored by the Educational Testing Service which still administers the exam. The test is intended to assess a student’s readiness for college. It was first introduced in 1901, and its name and scoring have changed several times.

State of Residence - A person’s permanent address as determined by such evidence as a driver’s license or voter registration. For entering freshmen, state of residence may be the legal state of residence of a parent or guardian.

STEM – The acronym for science, technology, engineering and math; scientific and technical fields of study.

Stop Out - A student who left the institution and returned at a later date.

Study Abroad - Arrangement by which a student completes part of the college program studying in another country. Can be at a campus abroad or through a cooperative agreement with some other U.S. college or an institution of another country.

Student Employment/Student Worker - Part-time jobs made available to students with financial need through federally-funded programs (Work-Study) and to students without need.

Student Goal Attainment – The proportion of students whose goals for attaining a college education upon enrolling or during attendance in a college were met upon exit from the college.

Student Outcomes Assessment – The systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development.

Success Mentor (SM) – Success Mentors provide individualized support for students experiencing difficulties with academic performance. They work with students who have been referred by faculty or who are on probation, requesting readmission following academic dismissal, or requesting a third course repeat.

Success Mentors Program - Provides services through scheduled sessions and electronic communication to improve academically-related skills and establish a pattern of behaviors leading to personal growth and academic success.

Summer Session - A summer session is shorter than a regular session and is not considered part of the academic year. It is not the third term of an institution operating on a trimester system or the fourth term of an institution operating on a quarter calendar system. The institution may have two or more sessions occurring in the summer months. Some schools, such as vocational and beauty schools, have year-round classes with no separate summer session.

Supplemental Instruction (SI) - Supplemental Instruction supports the Owens mission of success by providing academic and social support through in-class activities; regularly scheduled outside-of-class study sessions; and first year experience programs that engage the students within their first 30 credit hours and provide reference points and assistance in later semesters.

Syllabus/Syllabi/Course Outline - A course outline provided by the instructor that delineates course requirements, grading criteria, course content, faculty expectations, deadlines, examination dates, grading policies, class attendance requirements, and other relevant course information.

Technical Major - Majors that consist of twelve to sixteen semester credit hours and constitute an area of specialization

Technical Program – Career/Technical programs that require completion of sixty semester credit hours and prepare students for immediate employment upon graduation.

Third Party Promissory Note (TPP) -  Is a written promise to repay a loan or debt under specific terms - usually at a stated time, through a specified series of payments, or upon demand to the College.

Transfer Credit/Articulated Credit - The number of course credits taken by a student at one college that another college accepts.

Transfer Student - A student applying for admission to Owens who previously attended other colleges, universities, or post- secondary schools who wants to transfer and obtain a degree or certificate from Owens.

Transient Student - A student applying for admission to Owens who is attending another college or university who wants to enroll at Owens before returning to their home institution.

Tuition - The amount of money charged to students which must be paid for courses based on the number of credits for which the student registers.

Web-based Computer Adaptive Placement Exam (WEBCape) - The CAPE tests are web-based exams designed to assist in the placement of students into the first three semesters of college-level language study or to determine when a student should enroll in a course beyond the third semester.

Weekend Classes - Weekend classes are offered beginning at 5:00 PM on Friday evening and continue throughout the weekend until 9:50 PM on Sunday evening.